The United Diocese of Down And Dromore

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Belfast Cathedral explores Brexit and borders through Lent series

Belfast Cathedral explores Brexit and borders through Lent series

Friday 15 February 2019

Belfast Cathedral invites the public, politicians, business people, students and anyone with an interest in public theology to a series of five lunchtime events focused on Brexit during Lent.

Wednesdays in Lent is a collaboration between the Cathedral and the Corrymeela Community. The programme, entitled ‘Theology in the City – Brexit and the Book of Ruth’ will take place in St Anne’s each Wednesday for five weeks from March 13.

The talk and discussion will run from 1.05 pm–1.50 pm. Attendees are also invited for Holy Communion (12.00 pm–12.30 pm) and refreshments from 12.30 pm, or are welcome to bring their own lunch.

This series is facilitated by Glenn Jordan, Director of Public Theology for Corrymeela (pictured above). Session topics are as follows:

March 13: Ruth and the Law

The biblical book of Ruth concludes with an obscure legal procedure which extends the full protections of the Hebrew law to the foreigner Ruth, and it does it in response to the kindness of this stranger. In this gathering we will look at the liturgical setting of the book in Jewish tradition and in turn the importance of kindness in the Brexit debate.

March 20: Crossroads Decisions

The book of Ruth instantly pitches us into famine and dislocation. It challenges our stereotypes and invites the reader to consider a new understanding of community based on character and relationship rather than blood and ethnicity. What new possibilities of national self–understanding are open to us in the Brexit debate, and what dangers might lurk there?

March 27: The Challenge of the Migrant

Chapter 2 of the book introduces us to the fragile lives of those who are poor and to the potential dangers that face migrant workers. By looking at the possible origin of the book we might hear a counter–narrative to the one most often told about strangers. What counter narratives exist as we stand on the cusp of major change?

April 3: Who is Family?

In chapter three there are strange goings on that bear the whiff of scandal, and we are face to face with the lengths that vulnerable women have to go to to gain some security. But it also challenges us as to the nature of family, belonging and kinship. Brexit has placed a strain on these elements of our lives together on these islands. How do we navigate the complexity?

April 10: The Political importance of Compassion

The elaborate legal procedure in chapter 4 may seem archaic but it hides a radical approach to the issues of land, ownership, identity and relationships. It also highlights the social importance of compassion. How do we ensure kindness and compassion are part of the national and international reconciliation process after March 29th?

 

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